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Real Audio Archives
new Gus Chambers - Bicycle Corps
In 1897, the U.S. Army launched an experiment to test if the safety bicycle, then a revolutionary vehicle, could be used to transport troops instead of the horse. The 25th Infantry, composed of 20 African American soldiers, took the 2,000-mile ride from Missoula, Montana to St. Louis, Missouri. (7:25) www.npr.org
new The Changing Face of America: Huffy's Move from Ohio to China
Huffy recently closed off their manufacturing plant in Celina, Ohio and moved the plant to China. John Ydstie interviews former employees to see how they feel about the move and how they are coping with it. Rob Gifford goes to the town in China where Huffy Bicycles are now made takes a tour of the plant and talks with the some of the new employees. www.npr.org
A Family's Cross Country Bicycle Tour
Interview with the Romp family of Shoreham, Vermont, about their "Wind in the Face" cross country bicycle tour. Father Billy and his 8-year-old son Henry join us from Fairbanks, Alaska. The family began their trip in April from their home in Vermont, and are now closing in on their final destination: Homer, Alaska. (5:30) www.npr.org

Bicycle Messengers Unite in S.F
Elaine Korry reports on union organizing efforts among bicycle messengers in San Francisco. Bike messengers at one delivery service have already signed up with the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, and messengers at another company are also moving in that direction. (5:37) www.npr.org

Lance Armstrong Leading Tour de France
Interview with Lance Armstrong, an American cyclist leading the Tour de France bicycle race. Armstrong finished 31st in the 18th-stage of the 20-stage race today, but holds on to a commanding overall lead of six minutes. He's now the favorite to win the Tour, which finishes up on Sunday. Armstrong has made a remarkable showing in the race, having returned to cycling after surgery for testicular cancer. (5:00) www.npr.org
Tour de France and Drugs
Tom Goldman reports on the imminent start of the Tour de France bicycle race. Last year the famous bicycle race was mired in drug scandals, and despite vows to clean up the competition, things aren't getting off to a good start this year. There have been drugs raids on team members' homes, and the reinstatement of a rider banned from last year's event because of drugs. (5:38) www.npr.org
Gender Stereotyping with Bicycle Names
Interview with Diane Daniel, an editor at the Boston Globe, and writer for "Bicycling Magazine," about the marketing of bikes to boys and girls using names which to some, suggest gender stereotyping. For example, one of Giant's bikes for boys is called "Animator" while it's bike for girls is called "Pudd'n." Diamond Back has a boys' bike called "Micro Viper" while its girls' bike is called "Lil' One." (3:30) www.npr.org
Bicycle Messengers Attempt to Unionize
Bicycle messengers in San Francisco are gearing up for their first serious attempt at unionizing. The couriers say they are fed up with low wages and minimal respect. Aimee Pomerleau reports. (5:12) pacifica.org
Lance Armstrong Comeback
Tom Goldman reports on the surprising comeback of Lance Armstrong. Armstrong, the best-known American bicycle racer other than Greg LeMond. It's been a remarkable six-weeks for Armstrong, who two years ago was diagnosed with testicular cancer and given a 50 per cent chance of surviving. (3:30) www.npr.org
Marco Patani Wins the Tour de France
Jennifer Ludden reports from Paris where Marco Patani became the first Italian in 33 years to win the Tour de France bicycle race. This year the race was plagued by drug scandals involving at least six teams, and organizers and fans wonder if the competition can recover. (3:56) www.npr.org
Drug Use in Cycing Races
Interview with Sam Abt, who has covered the Tour de France bicycle race for the International Herald Tribune and the New York Times for the last two decades. They discuss the drug scandals that have rocked both the French and Dutch teams in the competition. A masseur for the French Festina cycling team was arrested for smuggling doping products into the country. www.npr.org
Drug Scandals With the Tour de France
A drug scandal has tarnished the Tour De France, the famous international bicycle race. Late last night, officials kicked the world's top team out of the race, after their coach admitted he's supplied the members with illegal performance-enhancement drugs. NPRs Jennifer Ludden reports from Paris. (4:00) www.npr.org

The Scorcher Bicycle
Interview with Wes Williams, owner of the Crested Butte Bicycle company in Colorado. The bicycles Williams builds are called Scorchers, but neither the Scorcher name nor its design were his idea. The Scorcher bicycles Williams makes are similar in design to their late nineteenth century predecessors. www.npr.org

Bicycle Couriers in Boston
Laura Rozen reports from Boston on the controversy caused by new city rules regulating bicycle couriers. (4:20) www.npr.org
AfricaTrek Bicycle Trip Accross
Interview with Dan Buettner about his book, "AfricaTrek." In 1992, Buettner rode his bicycle the length of Africa with three other cyclists. Although the group encountered many dramatic hardships including malaria, countries in civil war, and stampeding hippos. (8:00) www.npr.org

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